News Archive

MAGLAB SCIENCE HIGHLIGHT

Mystery of the Origin of MRI Signal in Stroke Solved

MRI scans taken after a stroke show brightness around the injury, the origins of which have been a long-standing and vexatious mystery for scientists. This work suggests these MRI signal changes result from fluid changes in glial cell volumes, results that could advance our ability to distinguish reversible and irreversible stroke events or provide a better understanding for other disorders such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and mood or sleep disorders.

MRI of ischemic stroke

Tallahassee, FL, November 4-6, 2022

50th Southeastern Magnetic Resonance Conference

MRI scans taken after a stroke show brightness around the injury, the origins of which have been a long-standing and vexatious mystery for scientists. This work suggests these MRI signal changes result from fluid changes in glial cell volumes, results that could advance our ability to distinguish reversible and irreversible stroke events or provide a better understanding for other disorders such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and mood or sleep disorders.

Hosted by the National MagLab & FSU

MAGLAB SCIENCE HIGHLIGHT

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide from Peat Wetland Ecosystems

The organic composition of soils in peat wetlands determines if carbon is available to be aerobically converted into carbon dioxide gas as a result of either a warming climate or drainage of wetlands for development. This research demonstrates an explicit link between the oxygen-alkyl groups (i.e., carbohydrates) in the peat and the amount of CO2 production. The solid-state NMR spectrometer used in this research employs a MagLab-designed probe that produces uniform magnetic fields and minimal sample heating, allowing intact soil samples to be analyzed with no further chemical processing or alteration of their sample profile. The first-author student on this paper received an NSF Graduate Fellowship to travel the world to work with Smithsonian and La Trobe scientists to collect the peat samples.

This research was conducted in the 500 MHz/54 mm Bruker Avance III analyzed by magic angle spinning (MAS) 13C NMR spectroscopy at the MagLab's AMRIS Facility located at the University of Florida.

UF HEALTH RESEARCH

AMRIS 3T MRI systems support UF AI research on cognitive aging

By applying computer vector machine modeling to 45-minute MRI brain scans, UF researchers reported that the algorithm could predict the progression from amnestic mild cognitive impairment to dementia with over 94% accuracy. Furthermore, they reported that the algorithm produced 92.7% accuracy when using a shorter, 10-minute MRI brain scan. These findings were published in the journal Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, click Learn More to navigate to the publication.

Joseph Gullett, Ph.D., a research assistant professor in UF’s College of Public Health and Health professions, led a study demonstrating AI’s potential to accurately predict dementia development in 55 participants.
Originally published for UF Health on Dec 6, 2021, by Michelle Koidin Jaffee and Todd Taylor: https://m.ufhealth.org/news/2021/uf-study-shows-artificial-intelligence-s-potential-predict-dementia

UF HEALTH RESEARCH

AMRIS joins national HBCD study

The University of Florida is one of a network of institutions selected to implement the National Institutes of Health’s HEALthy Brain and Child Development (HBCD) Study or HBCD, a longitudinal, multidisciplinary effort to study brain development and behavioral health in young children. The HBCD study, which involves 25 institutions across the country, will enroll thousands of pregnant women and their babies and follow them through early childhood to identify trajectories of brain development. A portion of this study will be performed on the 3T MRI systems at the MagLab's AMRIS Facility inside the McKnight Brain Institute.

https://heal.nih.gov/research/infants-and-children/healthy-brain

MagLab Science Highlight SEPT-NOV 2021

Restoration of breathing after drug overdose and spinal cord injuries

An insect's ability to survive anaerobic conditions (without oxygen) during winter pupation occurs through periodic cycling of aerobic respiration pathways needed to recharge energy and clear waste. The cellular mechanisms at play during these brief near-arousal periods can provide clues to help improve the success in storage and transplant of human organs. This research was conducted in the 14.1T equipped with a HTS CryoProbe and Agilent Console at the MagLab's AMRIS Facility located at the University of Florida.

Impulse stimulated breathing

MagLab Science Highlight, MAY-JUNE 2021

HTS NMR Probe Tracks Metabolism Cycles During Insect Dormancy

An insect's ability to survive anaerobic conditions (without oxygen) during winter pupation occurs through periodic cycling of aerobic respiration pathways needed to recharge energy and clear waste. The cellular mechanisms at play during these brief near-arousal periods can provide clues to help improve the success in storage and transplant of human organs. This research was conducted in the 14.1T equipped with a HTS CryoProbe and Agilent Console at the MagLab's AMRIS Facility located at the University of Florida.

fleshflydev

STILL ONLINE: VIRTUAL EVENTS, ONLINE DEMOS, AND TOURS!

MagLab Open House 2021

This event is no longer live/interactive, but videos are still online for you to enjoy! Join the science fun through special MagLab video demonstrations, all access video tours, online games, and activities for audiences of all ages.

MagLab Open House 2021

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AMRIS Science Highlight, November 2020-February 2021

Congratulations to our AMRIS-affiliated University of Florida faculty and students Marc McLeod, Rohit Mahar, Clayton E. Mathews, and Matthew E. Merritt, whose research on the effects of "ketogenic" diets on liver metabolism was recently selected as one of the National MagLab's Science Highlights. We have posted a description of the research, intended for a general audience, on the MagLab website. The page also includes more technical descriptions of the research and a link to the original publication. Please feel free to share this feature with your networks, and congratulations on this featured project from UF's Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. We are pleased to provide access to the advanced instrumentation needed for your research!

liver metabolism